Ascension Stories #19: Alice Jump


Empowered by Effective Empathy

By: Brian Reinthaler

The ability to put yourself in another's shoes—to see the world through their eyes—may be the most valuable skill a lawyer can develop. In this episode, commercial and employment litigator Alice Jump (Partner, Reavis Page Jump LLP) sat down with Ascension to share how her path, from an inspiring childhood education to BigLaw in the 1980s, in-house in the 90s, and now boutique law firm leadership, has instilled in her an appreciation for empathy as an invaluable advocacy and business development tool.

 

 

See Alice (and her colleague, Nicole Page) in action in the AltaClaro Webcast, "#MeToo, Now What? The Sexual Harassment Debate from the Legal Trenches." Alice and Nicole present on and answer audience questions about workplace sexual harassment and the legal and cultural shifts necessary to address these behaviors and progress toward eliminating them altogether.

Also, catch up on previous episodes of Ascension Stories:

  • Episodes #1 and #2, featuring employment litigator and Littler Shareholder Jeanine Conley

  • Episodes #3 and #10, featuring Tiffany Comprés (Partner in the Miami office of Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg, and Proskauer Rose alumna)

  • Episodes #4#5, Part I#5 Part II, and #6, featuring Audrey Ingram, Partner at Richards Kibbe & Orbe

  • Episodes #7 and #8, also featuring Jeanine Conley

  • Episode #9, featuring Julie Ryan, AltaClaro's Head of Experiential Learning (and Partner at Acceleron Law Group)

  • Episode #11, featuring Greg Stoller, healthcare/corporate transactions Partner at Abrams Fensterman

  • Episode #12 and #13, featuring Beate Parra, Managing Director & Head of Legal at UniCredit

  • Episodes #14, #16, and #18, featuring Darren Teshima, Partner & Co-Chair of Complex Litigation at Orrick

  • Episodes #15 and #17, featuring Jim Walker, Partner & General Counsel at Richards Kibbe & Orbe


Related

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For business owners, such as equity partners in law firms, customer acquisition cost is a crucial piece of information, and one that not enough attorneys consider as they seek to build their books of business, especially given how simply it can be calculated and applied to business development initiatives.

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